221 Remington Fireball

Discussion in 'Rifle Opinions' started by j870sm, Dec 8, 2008.

  1. j870sm

    j870sm Well-Known Member

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    I can pick up a brand new 221 Rem. Fireball synthetic stock, fluted barrel. Didn't even think about it enough to look at the model number, I know it was a Remington. Now that I am not in the store I have been thinking about it.

    What is your thoughts on this round? I do not have easy access to any reloading manuals (still packed up from the move) so I can't check this round out. What is a good comparison to this round? Is it worth looking at a little harder? I have a couple of 22-250's and more .223's so I have varmint rifles a plenty. Just thought this would be interesting to have.
     
  2. jcwat

    jcwat Super Member

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    ballistically inferior to the .223 and .22-250. but since you said it would be neat to have, then enjoy your new rifle. since you reload you can meet/exceed wimpy factory rounds.
    i too enjoy odd guns. .30-30 revolver/bolt action .45-70 just a few. why settle for plain off the rack guns!!!!!
     

  3. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    The 221 fireball was used alot in the rem XP-100 pistol.The rifles chambered for that cartridge were very accurate,easy to reload for.A nice cartridge to have around.Drop-Shot
     
  4. j870sm

    j870sm Well-Known Member

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    Considering it is less than the 223 performance wise and the current state of the economy I am going to pass on this rifle. I just don't feel that I am getting much punch.

    I am playing with an idea of building a long range varmint rifle(`1000yd rifle) but I am stuck high center on caliber. I feel pretty sure about the trigger, stock, barrel and action. I still have some work to do on the optics decision as well.

    Suggestion on caliber at this time is a 6.5x284 but I have not had time to really look at this round. I might need to shelve the whole thing until the economy turns around. We both may end up having to find new jobs and we both have been with the same company for 23 years.
     
  5. jcwat

    jcwat Super Member

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    give a shout to D&Tcustomgunworks.com. they built my .35 whelen. it is sweet. they are also building me a custom .30-06. david is the guy you're looking for. they call long range rifles "bean field guns", i guess cause they shoot over soy beans???
     
  6. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    870 I heard today about a 30/06 case necked to 6.5,not sure about the pressures but it would give abit better velocity than the sweede round.
    I also talked to a fellow thats having a 300 win mag rebarreled to 35 cal.The 358 Norma mag would be the closest comparable round but I can NEVER find 358 Norma mag cases,300 win mag cases are cheap and plentiful.Not sure if that much power would be usefull as the 35 Whelen shot through 95% of plains game Townsend Whelen used it on,regular bullets may self destruct with too much velocity.
    I have a feeling alot of projects will be put on the back burner for most of us till things straighten out.
    I think of the 221 fireball as kinda like the 22 hornet,alot of rounds are faster but the hornet is a hoot to shoot.Just my opinion and like you I would have to pass on the 221 fireball also.Take care.Drop-Shot
     
  7. j870sm

    j870sm Well-Known Member

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    I am familiar with the "bean field guns" alot of people were shooting these where I came from in Ar. We had a lot of open ground, shooting across rice, bean and wheat fields. That is when I started shooting a 7mm mag. I had been shooting a 30-06 (a 760 carbine) and still shoot it some. I have since had a 7mmSTW built by a local gunsmith in my area. He did really good work and was very customer oriented. I am not sure he is still in business. A lot of the gun shops have closed in this area simply because they can't compete with Wal Mart, Bass Pro and Cabela's. There is another guy that is still in business and runs a very small shop. He is said to be the inventor of the B.O.S.S. system. He does superb work and is not that high on his prices. I have a 300 RUM that he put a brake on and you can't tell it is attached until after 5 or so shots (get some grease ring). The flutes match so perfectly it is unbelievable. He did some other accuracy work on the gun and it is incredibly accurate. He jeweled the bolt, replaced the trigger and set it.