Buying a muzzleloader

Discussion in 'Black Powder' started by Jeff23, Jun 12, 2004.

  1. Jeff23

    Jeff23 Well-Known Member

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    Hi All--

    I'm fixin' to get ready to buy my first muzzleloader. :) I live about five miles away from the Traditions factory in Connecticut, and they sell their stuff in there for unbelievably low proces. Usually it's a rifle with a minor nick or two on the stock, priced way down.

    So I'll probably go with a traditions Pursuit (break-open) or Evolution (bolt). I'd appreciate any advice as to whether a break-open or bolt action is better. Also, it looks to me that .50 caliber is the most popular. I'm trying to keep this fairly simple, so I'm figuring on sabots in front of pyrodex or triple-seven pellets. The rifle will be used for deer in our late muzzloader season. Scopes are legal in Connecticut, but I don't plan to scope it, at least not right away.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. gwp4ever

    gwp4ever Super Member

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    I prefer the regular old smokepole, no bolt action, no break open. Sabots arent' legal for muzzleloading here and neither are scopes. I use triple seven but not in pellet form and have had great results. .50 cal has served me well for deer and elk but I wouldn't go any smaller. I know a few guys who shoot a .54 but they beat you down. Try several different powder ans bullet combos because some guns can be picky.
     

  3. wwb

    wwb Super Member

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    Your choice depends on what you want out of hunting with a muzzleloader. If it's meat, get one of the in-lines that use a 209 primer and pellets, and shoot sabots. If it's challenge, nostalgia, and tradition, get a real fron stuffer, like a Hawken or Kentucky rifle. Caplocks are the most popular. As was mentioned, some states don't allow sabots or any kind of optical sight during muzzleloader season - check your regulations.

    Me? It's hardcore all the way - I shoot a .54 flintlock. I've missed a few because of a misfire or a delayed fire, but it's just a gas to have that huge "POOF" when the pan ignites and the thunderclap about a second later (sometimes seems like a week later).
     
  4. Jeff23

    Jeff23 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the responses, guys. The object of my hunt is meat--I'm buying the muzzleloader in order to take advantage of a longer hunting season. Thus, I want to go for a good clean kill. From your advice, it sounds like .50 caliber is the right choice.

    Also, after reading WWB's remarks I double-checked our laws (see below) Sabots and scopes are ok, but the law specifies "powder." I'm going to check with the Coalition of Connecticut Sportsmen, of which I'm a memeber, to make sure pyrodex pellets are ok. Common sense says it should be fine, but since when was sense common in state gun laws? :lol:

    "During Muzzleloader Deer Seasons, a muzzleloader means a rifle or shotgun, .45 caliber minimum, incapable of firing a self-contained cartridge, using powder and a single projectile loaded separately at the muzzle end. Shotgun converters and telescopic sights are legal. Restrictions on the use of smoothbore muzzleloaders for hunting small game and waterfowl are the same as those for shotguns. Restrictions on the use of muzzleloading rifles for hunting small game are the same as those for rifles, except that on state-owned land, up to a .36 caliber muzzleloading rifle using round ball ammunition only may be used. A capped percussion lock firearm or a flintlock firearm having powder in the pan is considered a loaded firearm."
     
  5. Jeff23

    Jeff23 Well-Known Member

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    Well, just in case anyone's following this thred, I thought I'd post and let you know what happened. I went into the Traditions factory store today, and they were selling .50 caliber in-line muzzleloaders, synthetic stocks, straight pull "bolt," for $99 each. These were apparently last year's extras or something. They have full factory warranty, and the even come with a really crappy scope, which I'm going to remove. They do have the excellent Traditions tru-glo type front & rear open sights, so I'll just use them.

    Also checked with BNR and the guy I talked to said that triple-seven is considered powder even when not in powdered form. He also chuckled and said not to inquire too much, that I might give some anti-hunters ideas. :lol:
     
  6. gwp4ever

    gwp4ever Super Member

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    Enjoy the new gun, I'm sure you'll have alot of fun with it.