How accurate should I be at 100yds?

Discussion in 'Rifle Talk' started by blkntan44, Jul 25, 2004.

  1. blkntan44

    blkntan44 Member

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    I took my first trip to the range yesterday. I have never owned a rifle with a scope before, and was a little unsure what to do, but the rangemaster (John) at the range (Elm Fork in Dallas) was very helpful. I bought a Savage 110 in .30-06 with a Simmons 3-9x50 scope a few days ago. I was shooting Federal Premium Vital-Shok, 150 grain nosler ballistic tips through it. Here are the results.

    I was going for 2"high at 100yds. Puts it roughly 0-1"low at 200yds, which is about as far as I plan on shooting.

    1st shot: 1.25"left and 2.75"high
    adjust scope
    2nd shot: .75"left and .75"high
    adjust scope
    3rd shot: centerline and .75"high
    4th shot: .25"right and .75"high (3rd and 4th holes touching)
    adjust scope
    5th shot: centerline and 3.5"high
    6th shot: centerline and 3.5"high (5th and 6th holes touching)
    adjust scope
    7th shot: .25"left and 2"high
    8th shot: .25left and 2"high (7th and 8th holes touching)

    pack up and go home. I figure I am close enough.

    Is this accurate enough at 100yds, or should I be looking to do better?

    Any advice would be appreciated. Also, how much variation can I expect when switching to different ammo (Winchester Supreme 180grain, Power PointPlus)? Does this require recentering the rifle? Should I be keeping notes, as far as what ammo shoots where at what scope settings?

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. wwb

    wwb Super Member

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    The general procedure is first to decide what ammunition you're going to shoot... in reference to your question about different types of ammunition, changing ammo can have almost no effect, or it can blow you right out of the water. The only way to tell is by shooting it all, because every gun reacts differently to a change in ammunition.

    First, decide what type of ammunition you will probably shoot... say a 165 grain boattail... changing brands of bullet usually has a negligible effect - weight and profile are the important factors. Then, just get it "on the paper" at 100 yards, clean the barrel, fire one fouling shot, and run a dry patch through the bore. Now, fire a three-shot group with the crosshairs on the bull for every shot. You're not trying to zero the rifle yet - you're looking for performance problems, loose scope mounts, etc. If all three shots can be covered with a half-dollar, then go ahead and zero the rifle.... but once you're close, let the barrel cool, dry patch it, and fire a three-shot group, using the center of the group to make your zero correction - if you adjust after each shot, you'll spend the whole day going up, down, left, and right an inch at a time. Once a three-shot group has the point of impact that you're looking for, you're finished.

    If you can't cover your group with a half-dollar, try a different brand of ammo, different bullet weight, check for barrel bedding problems, check for loose scope mounts, or refine your hold and trigger squeeze.

    If you switch to another type of ammunition, your trajectory may not be the only thing that changes... you may find your shots walking to the left or right. A second choice would be one that's used only for close range, where a change in trajectory wouldn't be critical. The best advice, though, is to pick one that performs well in your rifle and stick with it.
     

  3. TXVAshooter

    TXVAshooter Super Member

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    Find ammo that shoots good groups, and stick with it. Thewn work the grouping to the dead center of the target, provided you're zeroing the rifle. I always set mine to shoot for zeroing, then note how it shoots at closer and farther ranges. But then again, I shoot a .243, with shots not much farther than 200, with 100 grain bullets. It puts a group on paper within a silver dollar at 125 yards (when i don't mess it up.) It could probably shoot tighter if I tweaked it with reloads and starting shooting better. 3 or 4 holes touching each other would be ideal.
     
  4. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    Boy wwb is right on ,again.I shot Nosler partitions and hornadys 180 gr.I got in a bind and left ammo in my truck.I bought a box of PMC with barnes bullets,still180 gr.I shot about 8 inches high and to the right with these rounds,I missed the x ring and shot several times to sight in.Pick a brand,gr,and stay with it is basicly is what I learned.180 core locks may shoot different from 180 gr PMC or winchester or any other brand,listen to wwb and years of experience.Drop-Shot
     
  5. mountainview

    mountainview Super Member

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    Sounds like you were shooting 1-2 shot groups which will not give you a really good idea of what group size or "accuracy" the rifle/cartridge combo is going to give. I'd recommend shooting 3-5 shot groups once you are dialed into the center ring.This will give a truer picture of how accurate the load actually is.

    The Savage is noted for tack driving, as noted above, you may have to try different loads to find the right one.

    Safe shooting.
     
  6. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    mountainview you are right on again but all I had was 1 box of pmc and I was stupid to leave my ammo ,but in montana you don't carry the ammo with the rifle and I load down,so I'm not getting as high velocity and thats why I shot high with pmc barnes loads.But you are right I should have shot at least 2 strings of 3 shots to check for accuracy of that load,but I was hunting with some one else and I new I would be far off the beaten path.We saw plenty elk but on the far side of a mountain I was not willing to climb.With a spotting scope they were small,about 4miles up hill on a rocky slope.I shot a 5x4 muley on the way back to the truck almost at dark.I had to reajust when I went back to my loads,and as usual about 1 1/2 inches at 100 yards.Drop-Shot
     
  7. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    mountainview I shoot an older type ruger 30/06 with a leupold 3x9.wwb gave me some ideas about getting better groups,I plan on working up a load with 165 gr hornadys and see if I can shrink my groups.I have all my reloading stuff and will get started next week.Drop-Shot
     
  8. mountainview

    mountainview Super Member

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    Hey D-Shot, any luck in getting your rifle dialed in with the handloads? I am off tomorrow to test my Savage 110 30-06 (got new rings and replacement scope) with some 150 grain Core-Lokts. Next year I am going to try rolling my own and see how that goes.

    Don't feel too bad on having only one box of ammo and running out. Every time I feel confident that I only need a box or handful to sight in, you can probably guess what happens.
     
  9. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    Hey mountainview thanks for understanding my dilema,and I am working up a great load combination.wwb suggested I try 165gr bullets and boy did that make a difference.I slowley worked up to 52 gr IMR 4350 with hornadys boat tail spire point and all shots now touch,I am tearing a 1 inch square out with 5 shots of max loads.That is the best I have ever gotten out of this ruger.wwb also suggested I try Sierra 165 game kings and I ordered them a couple of days ago.He said and I have read recently that Sierra's are one of the most concentric bullets made,so I may even shrink that 1 inch hornady load.You have to get into reloading,it's one of the most rewarding things with hunting,and target shooting.Are you a NRA member?They put on shows and seminars about getting the most out of your gun,rifle or hand gun.When I get a load put together thats as good as I can do,then I will make at least 2 boxes so I never run short again,and will store them with my back pack.How is your season looking?Drop-Shot