Peep Sights ???

Discussion in 'Rifle Talk' started by Haplo, Nov 12, 2004.

  1. Haplo

    Haplo New Member

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    I have a peep sight on a military rifle. I have only shot it a couple of times and I'm not sure of exactly how you use these sights. I only use open iron sights for all my other rifles. Is it a good system? Could I find one to go on a NEF Tracker II?
     
  2. mountainview

    mountainview Super Member

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    Peeps are a good system IMO, better than open sights. I've cloverleafed groups with peeps on a 22 rimfire that I could not duplicate with open sights at the same distance. Peeps are easy to use, your eye will naturally try to center the front dot in the center of the rear aperture. You want to get the front dot centered and then squeeze the trigger, about all there is to it. Takes a little practice and getting used to at first but after using peeps, it is hard for me to go back to open sights.

    Not sure about mounting peeps on a Tracker. Some of the NEF posters or a savvy gunsmith might be able to provide more info though I don't think it would be doable on a break-action.
     

  3. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    I plan on using a peep(apeture)sight on my 1895 marlin cowboy with a 26 inch octagon barrell.I like the looks and I feel that at the distances the 45/70 has,it should work well.Drop-Shot
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Haplo,

    I spent most of my big game hunting career armed with a Model 1903 Springfield that was converted into sporting configuration by Griffin and Howe in 1927. It was equipped with the excellent Lyman Nodel 48 apreture sight. I never missed the telescopic sight that I didn't have, though I fully recognize all of the advantages they offer.

    If you don't think about it too much, your eye will automatically "center" the foresight in the apreture -nothin' to it, really. But if you try to think to hard about what you're doing, that might not happen. I suppose that sounds kind of nebulous, but that's the best way I think of to describe how to use the apreture sight in the field. Just shoulder your rifle, look through the hole and put the forsight bead where you want the bullet to go, and squeeze the shot off. It's as simple as that.

    At least, it was for me during the 18 seasons that I hunted with my old '03.

    -JP
     
  5. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    Mr Shelton I wonder how long Griffen & Howe has been around?Back when I was a lad of 15 or 16 I shot a Griffen & howe(Probebly misspelled)375 H&H mag with open sights.They have built rifles that sell for alot,I've seen an old 458 win mag that was old but sold for 1200.00 with open sights.Any idea how long these guys have been around?Drop-Shot
     
  6. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    Mr Shelton you want believe this but Griffin & Howe is still in business and has a web site.just go to a search engine like yahoo and type in Griffin & Howe,in business since 1923 and still produces a bueatiful fire arm,shot guns and rifles.A basic rifle sells for 2500.00 and that is on a customers winchesters mod 70.There own sells for money I spent on my first house.Drop-Shot
     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Drop Shot,

    Griffin and Howe have been a going concern for a long, long time.

    There's a story about how I obtained mine, and I'll keep it brief.

    I've been interested in hunting and fishing since my childhood days. I've also been a huge fan of Ernest Hemingway's writing, and Green Hills of Africa is one of my all-time favorite books. When Hemingway went on his first safari, he caried a Griffin and Howe Springfield, and I wanted one because of that since I was nine years old.

    Well, my dentist during my childhood years was one of these fellows who knew how to live. He hunted all over the world, but he only owned one rifle -a 1927 vintage Griffin and Howe Springfield, which he had made for him back in '27 when he graduated from dentistry school. To hear him tell it, they weren't cheap, even then.

    Anyway, the dear old tooth doctor passed away. On the day I turned 18, his wife called me and asked if I'd like to buy "Doc's" rifle. I said that I would, but that I couldn't afford to pay her what it was worth. She told me that she'd sell it to me for $275.00, which was the going rate for a Ruger M-77 at the time, under the condition that I agreed to hunt with it every year until I couldn't hunt anymore. She figured "Doc" would have wanted me to have it, but she figured I'd treat it with care if I paid her "a little something" for it.

    I bought the rifle that day. If it hadn't have burned up in the same wildfire event that razed the family hunting cabin, I'd still be hunting with it now.

    I shot hogs, deer, elk, pronghorns, and a couple of mouflon rams with it during the 18 hunting seasons that I carried it. As I mentioned before, I never missed the telescopic sight that it didn't have. The peep sight worked very well for "Doc" right up to the year that he died, and it worked just fine for me, too.

    Anyhow, that's how I got my hands on mine. It was essentially given to me. The money that I paid was a mere fraction of the rifle's actual value, but to me, the rifle was priceless.

    -JP
     
  8. grimel

    grimel Well-Known Member

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    Note the FACTORY installed sight.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    grimal I'm green with envy,thats a bueatiful rifle and I bet you can hit well with it.Good luck buddy,you got a bueauty there.Drop-Shot
     
  10. grimel

    grimel Well-Known Member

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    Re: re: Peep Sights ???

    Not mine (I wish)! That's the pict off the web site for the target/buffalo rifles. A "tad" bit more spendy than the basic NEF Handi; but the sights can be used on any Handi.

    After opening day I'm considering the youth ultralight in 243 and swapping the open sight for a peep. It took me 1hr to climb the 400yds back up the side of the hill.