so, who has a mosin nagant?

Discussion in 'Bolt Action' started by chips, May 10, 2004.

  1. chips

    chips Well-Known Member

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    i got one a couple years ago at a gun show, and i think it is probably one of the funnest guns i have ever shot. despite the fact that it is almost 70 years old, and has a lot of wear, it still shoots great, and is very accurate. the 7.62x54R cartridge is a great round too. i think its one of the things that makes nagants so much fun 8)
     
  2. mapanggulo

    mapanggulo Well-Known Member

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    Chips,

    Maybe I should have looked around alittle, see you posted this a day before me. I'm too used to jumping in feet first at shotgunworld...would take me awhile to read through all the posts. Of course I could always use the search that Jay put on both forums...but that would be like reading the manual !!
     

  3. HOULLAMA

    HOULLAMA Member

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    Actually I have 3, a 1943 M38, a 1947 M44 and a 1939 M91/30. All are great shooters.

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  4. phideaux_2003

    phideaux_2003 Active Member

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    Buy a Model 39. They were made by Sako. They have a semi pistol grip and little flare guards around the front sight. I have 3, along with 8 other models of nagants. The 39's will cost you a bit more than the average nagant. For $175 bucks at a gunshow, you can't beat the price. I mean it is a Sako!!!

    http://www.auctionarms.com/search/displ ... um=5775468

    This is a very rare one. That is why it is so expensive.

    Nick
     
  5. Logjam

    Logjam Super Member

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    Wow, $500 bucks for a Moisin Nagant! I never thought I'd see it.

    I bought mine in about 1973 for $25. Mine is a Russian one, long barrelled scamp. Takes a spike kind of bayonette.

    BTW: I read someplace that the Moisin Nagants were made to be shot with the bayonette attached, and that you should afix one when you shoot it.

    I also read that they didn't issue a scabbard, as they wanted the soldiers to always have the knife attached.

    Mine shoots okay, but it sure kicks hard.
     
  6. wired

    wired Super Member

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    I've got a 1944-dated m44 and I've got a 1937-dated m91/30 (with the older hex reciever). They're a ton of fun to shoot. I've got them both on display on my fireplace mantle. I'll probably be getting more one of these days, just because they're so cheap and so fun.

    Actually, they were "sighted in" at the factory with bayonets attached (in the case of the m44, with them extended). If you fire them with the bayonet off/retracted most of the time, you'll want to drift your front sight a bit to adjust the POI accordingly.
     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    they sell the 38 carbines for around 89 to 99 here all day long every day at our local fleet farm sometimes they are on sell as low as 89 but generally 99

    they also always have the full military 39 i think it is with bayonets and the whole nine yards but those are always 99

    then they have the really long ones 44 i think it is and those are always 99.

    now these are not the best in the barrel upon initial inspection as they do a poor job of removing the carmarizing or however that is spelled but if you take them and tear them down and after about 3 cans of oven cleaner and many days later those stocks are quite nice

    would not recomend using the oven cleaner on the barrel but some good gun cleaner and some elbow greese and they clean up real nice.

    the rear sights have a nice elevator on it too. i find in a pinch they are not a bad gun really and if you want to get really cheap you can pick up a full ammo can (millitary issue for 35 bux) these are 350 rounds of 149 gr fmj in individual packs of 10 only bad part is they are non reloadable nato rounds so to speak and some have corrosive ammo in them (corrosive primer mostly)so you have to be very thorough and diligent about cleaning if you run this ammunition if not it only takes a week if that for it to start eating that barrel up but tell me what other gun you can buy thats not a terd for under 100 bux and shoot all day for 10 cents a shot

    the 7.62X54 by all rights is a 30 cal and not to far off from a 30 06. the long barreled ones get a good powder burn with the longer barrels and if your running a hot military load (like some of the full russian ammo cans) they can almost match the ballistics of your typical 06 load(keyword almost)
     
  8. fireguymike

    fireguymike Member

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    I have 3, 2 mod. 91/30s and a carbine mod. 38. I want something Finnish, mod, 27, 28 or 39 and also reload for the 7.62x54r.
     
  9. fireguymike

    fireguymike Member

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    I have 3, 2 mod. 91/30s and a carbine mod. 38. I want something Finnish, mod, 27, 28 or 39 and also reload for the 7.62x54r.
     
  10. Logjam

    Logjam Super Member

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    For many years the Mosin Nagant was the ONLY rifle in available in Russia. Soviets in the Steps used them to shoot everything from Polar Bears to rats.

    While the action looks simplistic to us, it's really very fast. You have to learn to work it with the palm of your hand and not try to grab it with your fingers, as we do with Mausers, etc..

    Russians won Olympic competitions with Mosin Nagants.

    So, while they look kind of junky; they aren't. There are still lots around too. For years and years, in the early 70's, they were a $20 gun. Even new ones....During those days the Finnish ones weren't readily available.
     
  11. wudjalike2no

    wudjalike2no Well-Known Member

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    which olympics?
     
  12. Logjam

    Logjam Super Member

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    Gosh, I don't recall. But I do recall reading stories about Soviets' extensive use of the Mosin Nagant, and how they used it for about everything.

    I was in a gun store just outside of Carson City, Nevada a few years ago. The guy had several cases of Mosin Nagant sniper rifles with the Soviet scope attached. Guns were cheap too, something like $250. But my wife pitched a fit when I said that I wanted to buy one.

    I should have bought one, and tolerated the fit.
     
  13. wired

    wired Super Member

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    Personally, I think they're quite beautiful (properly cleaned up, of course). The action is sheer brilliance, although it's a bit of a pain to operate it while still in a shooting position (damn straight bolt handle...). They're the one firearm my parents don't seem to give me much grief over. After the 6th or 7th firearm, it started to get old with them, but they didn't say anything when I started buying Mosins. Maybe that's a hint that I need to buy a few more..... (not that they can say anything anyway.... I passed the age where they can make those decisions for me LONG ago).
     
  14. Logjam

    Logjam Super Member

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    Did you find one of the old socket bayonets. They used to have hundreds of them in gun shows, but I don't think so now. I don't see many bayonets at all anymore.
     
  15. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

     
  16. wired

    wired Super Member

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    Yeah, I got one of the bayonets with my M91/30. I built a nifty stand out of poplar for the two Mosins I have so I could display them on my fireplace mantle. The light color of the poplar is a striking contrast to the deep reddish stain on the stocks. My M44 is on the top (bayo folded), and the M91/30 is on the bottom. I crafted a hanger of sorts on the stand for the bayonet, so it is also in the display.
     
  17. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    I bought a M91/30 with all the goodies for $106.00 out the door and love the big, too long, crude, fantastic rifle.

    As to too much oil in the stock...

    Solution: Get a clamp on lamp with a 100W bulb. Move the lamp close to the stock at one end or the other and put a bucket under the area. Don't get the bulb too close as to scorch the wood, and leave it there overnight...move down the stock each night, until you've dripped most of the excess oil out of the wood. This is the Hi-Tech method gunsmiths use... :idea:

    Now, that will be a nickle from each of you for technical advice... :wink:
     
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I have the m44 and I have got to say it is one of the best shooting rifles for the money.The only thing I don't care for is the safty style.It makes an awesome deer rifle,because you can beat the heck out of it and it still shoots straight.It would make a great gun for the beginner.
     
  19. Logjam

    Logjam Super Member

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    I've got to laugh. While I agree that the Mosin Nagant is a good rifle; for many years it was considered nothing more than junk. You could get one for $15. People used to buy them, cut them up and try to build sporting rifles from them.

    I have one and kind of like it. If I was to buy one to seriously shoot I'd make sure that I bought one of the Finnish ones.
     
  20. Big Yac

    Big Yac Active Member

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    I just shot a Mosin Nagant today. It was a pretty sweet rifle. The recoil was less than my 30-06 but the round did seem to carry plenty of power..it destroyed a bowling pin. I wouldnt mind one of these rifles to play with. It was pretty accurate too. After shooting that rifle I came home and watched Enemy at the Gates...and guess what gun the Russian sniper ( Vassili) is using....yup a Mosin Nagant. Ofcourse it was outfitted with a scope and such.