well luv2 i need to pick ur brain

Discussion in 'Medium Bore' started by markIVbigblock, Jun 8, 2004.

  1. markIVbigblock

    markIVbigblock Super Member

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    I feel the urge to buy a 375 H&H w/ some extra money i just came into and I had some questions I have a ruger #1 in 338 and ruger 77 in 300 win mag and I was wondering if the 375 kicks much harder than these BTW the new gun will probably be a ruger #1 although I have my eye on a sweet model 70 ok now my 2nd question is this too big to use on elk and caribou? Im thinking im gonna go w/ a 2-7 scope on it hopefully leupold. any advice would be appreciated thanx

    Aaron
     
  2. uglydog

    uglydog Super Member

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    I ain't Luv2safari but I got a 375 last fall myself. It is a Remington 700 in stainless/synthetic with a Leupold Vari-XII in 1-4x. It came with a Limbsaver on it and when I did my sighting in, it didn't seem to kick any more than my 12 ga Beretta 390 when shooting slugs. About 20 rounds was all the more I could comfortably put through it at one sitting using 270 gr Remingtons. I think it kicks noticeably more than my .300 Win mag A-Bolt but compared to the 338, it seems to be easier on the shoulder. I've fired 338s from Winchester and Remington and they were rather nasty to my thinking. The 375 was much more user friendly. It may have been the guns and that I fired the 338s back when I was younger and not as accustomed to heavier recoiling rifles. I don't think you should have any problems with a 375.
    As for game useage, most of my 375 knowledge is from books and a little from friends and relatives. I have hunted and taken caribou and elk but not with the 375. I think the 375 is a bit heavy for caribou in factory loads, these are animals in the 350 pound range at best. A buddy uses one on them but then it is his only rifle. Living in Alaska tends to cause one to change one's thoughts on "proper" calibers. Some consider it to be a bit much for elk but if one can shoot it well, who cares? I would think the Core-Lokts I have would work just fine as would some of the lighter offerrings from Hornady, I think. I plan on using mine on whitetails next year. Handloader magazine had an article on the 375 H&H last fall that listed a light load using 220 gr flat points meant for the Winchester 375 "Big Bore". At velocities around 2000 fps or so, it should be a very light recoiling round. It should also get plenty of raised eybrows around the stove at deer camp.
    I think a 2-7x scope would be the ticket for general use with this caliber. I would like to get one for mine some day. As my main use is protection when salmon fishing, I went with the 1-4x. I am considering open sights of some kind but don't know good from bad. I would enjoy any insight on them from others out there on both front and rear sights.
     

  3. markIVbigblock

    markIVbigblock Super Member

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    did u say whitetails?! :shock: isn that a little big for them even w/ 220 gr bullets? if not i may have found my new deer rifle now that im finally moving into a zone where i can use centerfire rifles it sux i wish all of michigan allowed centerfire rifles

    Aaron
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Yeah, I said whitetails. This load is very similar to the old blackpowder 38/55 cartridge which was a very good deer load in its day. These are not factory offerrings, one needs to reload them. I've loaded up a box of them but haven't got out to shoot them yet. Thinking about it, this load is also pretty similar to the 35 Remington with its 250 grain bullet. Speer makes a 200 gr, .375" bullet but they cost more and I read that they are not as accurate. The 200 gr Speer and 220 Hornady are designed to expand at these low velocities. The bullets of 235 gr and larger are designed for much higher velocities and the corresponding recoil. uglydog
     
  5. markIVbigblock

    markIVbigblock Super Member

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    hmmm in that case i may have to get into reloading Ive wanted to for a while but now i have an excuse :D

    Aaron
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Pick away...got a microscope and tweezers...? :wink:

    You picked my favorite caliber and the most versitile round in the world. It is marginal for elephant, but will do the job. It is over gunned for deer, but doesn't damage as much meat as a 270...as a rule...

    With 270 grain bullets it has the same trajectory as a 30-06 with 180's :idea:

    It has a BIG push for recoil, but hits much softer than that hard jabbing 338... :shock: ...and I do like the 338 Win. The 375 gets nice and tame with 235's and isn't too bad with 270's. It does let you know that you just pulled the trigger, however...won't ever be a p-u-s-s-y-c-a-t...just isn't in it's blood. 8)

    You also picked a great scope for the 375. The 2x7 Loopy is what is sitting on one of my three 375's. I have a 1.5x5 VXIII on another and a 3x9 VariXII on the third. I also have a Loopy 2.5x compact as the second scope for the one with the 3x9. It is a pre 64 Mdl 70, and I have Talley QD's on it; I use QD's on all heavy rifles and most of my other hunting rifles. The 3x9 is sighted in at 225 yards with my 270 gr. pet handload, and the 2.5x is sighted in for Woodleigh 350 gr solids and softs at 100 yards for closer and more serious work.

    I am a firm believer in the opinion that a 375 without good open sights is worth about as little as yesterday's newspaper.

    As to what rifle...I like the Ruger RSM, but they are expensive and hard to find. Don't overlook the CZ550. I used one on cape buffalo in 2000 in Tanzania in 416 Rigby. It shot tighter groups than any other bigger bore I own, or have owned. They need to have the action glassed, however; they tend to crack stocks real fast if this isn't done. $25.00 worth of bedding kit and a few hours at the kitchen table will solve that problem.

    I also like very much the 550's set trigger system and the rear sight one standing and two folding system. If you can get past the ugly European hog back stock design, you would like the CZ.

    For now stay way away from the Winchester Safari Classic, except for the SS/synthetic model. The blue/walnut series have serious feeding problems. Yes, I've had several of them and got rid of all three...FAST! My SS/synthetic was a wonderful rifle, however. I sadly sold it to a first time safari hunter.

    I am of the opinion, also, that a heavy caliber rifle should have at least two shots hiding within it...double rifle or magazine rifle...not a single shot. Big moose and larger bears are nothing to take lightly. :shock: :shock: We have some surley critters right here in North America. :twisted:

    Well, there is a whole passal of opinions about the 375 H&H. I hope I haven't muddied up the water too much... :D
     
  7. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    I'm getting too darned old! :?

    I forgot to log on in...that was me above. See what I mean about the microscope and tweezers...? :oops:

    Just get yourself a good 375 H&H and don't ask any more questions...!!! :wink: :lol:
     
  8. uglydog

    uglydog Super Member

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    Thanks for chiming in Safari, do you have any suggestions for good after market open sights for a Remington 700 in 375 H&H? I bought mine used and it was missing the rear leaf. I have no real preference as to peep or leaf sights. I'm not much of a fan of open sights but do realize there is a place for them, especially in a dangerous game gun. This gun's primary purpose is as protection while salmon fishing, someday I may get to Africa and use it for what it was designed for.
     
  9. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    ugly...
    NECG has wonderful sights for your rifle; they don't give them away, however. :shock: The price of a good sight should not be a consideration, IMHO. It is small potatos compared to the overall expense of the total hunt.

    I like a one standing or a one standing/one folding with a shallow "V" for the 375 and other close work type rifles. Properly designed and installed, they come right up with the front bead dead on top of the bottom of the V...Its almost like just point and shoot, but you are aiming instantly at the same time. :idea: I got back my Mdl 70 in 375 today from Dennis Olson in Plains Montana. He installed a NECG sight like I described (one standing) with a new front blade to match. He charged me $88.00 for the rear sight, front sight, and to drill and tap/install.

    Dennis is as good as it gets in his trade...! He also builds wonderful custom rifles on your action, or one he supplies. 8) :D

    Dennis Olson
    500 First St.
    Plains, MT 59859
    406-826-3790
     
  10. uglydog

    uglydog Super Member

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    Thanks for the tip. I was kind of leaning towards that set up but I don't know of anybody who has used them. Money is not an object when your life may be on the line thoug the scope I now have on this gun is one I actually planned to use on a different one. I would like to get the 2-7x but would also like to find one in silver to "match" the finish on my rifle. Vain, yes, but I have to look at it!! Blue scopes just look odd with stainless and vice versa. Thanks again for the advice.
     
  11. markIVbigblock

    markIVbigblock Super Member

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    thanx guys Ive got it down to a ruger #1 or a model 70 Im leaning towards the #1 even tho u told me i should want a couple more shots im just in love w/ #1s they are great i have one in .338 w/ a heavy match barrel and i came up w/ more money than i expected and have enough to put better glass on top than I thought so its either a zeiss or a leupold vx III I have never much experience w/ zeiss but have heard great things about them and I have 2 vx III's any opinions?

    Aaron
     
  12. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    I like Loopy's extra eye relief on the harder hitters...
     
  13. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Re: re: well luv2 i need to pick ur brain


    not at all my friend, im using the lightest gun of 3 people in my deer camp, my uncle uses a model 1894 p 44 rem mag with 260 grain jsp, my cousin uses a model 1895 guide gun 1895 45/70 with 510 gr. wad cutters, which, i guess it depends on the enviroment
     
  14. markIVbigblock

    markIVbigblock Super Member

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    well luv2 or whoever else wants to respond Im thinking of a new rifle and im thinking about the 375 H&H right now but I also really am thinkin about a .340 wby mag I really dont need either of them but im hoping someday to move somewhere where I can hunt elk and hopefully someday Ill get the chance to go to alaska for grizzly Im on a budget and ive found a used .340 mark v for 500$ and a used 375 H&H for $600 I know ammo for both is expensive particularly the weatherby but thats not a concern does anyone know where I can get the ballistic info for both of these? any help or opinions are appreciated thanx

    Aaron
     
  15. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    markIV,

    I just got back into the country and found your post. The 340Wby is a mean far killer! It also pounds the snot out of whoever stands behind it. :shock: I am a lover of the 375 H&H, but I must say that the 33 calibers are woundeful bores for North America.

    I prefer the 338 Win to the 340 Wby for several reasons. The 338 is everywhere, and you can pull into Vern's Gas & Ammo in Rabbit Hash, Wyoming and pick up a box of shells. It doesn't kick nearly as bad as the Weatherby, and the Weatherby stocks seem to be just about as bad a design for heavy recoil rifles as they could have dreamed up. That said, the 340 Wby is about the best long range elk killer ever conceived. Be sure to glass bed your teeth before you shoot it much.

    The 375 H&H with 270s has the same trajectory as a 30-06 with 180s. It works fine to 300 yards+. Most hunters can't hit a covey of big rigs much past that range; 300 yard shots in the field under hunting conditions are not easily made, and most hunters (myself included) should work in a bit closer before jerking off the shot. If you are a good and patient hunter, the 375H&H is all you should ever need.

    As for caribou, the 340 with a good bipod might be a fantastic choice. I've never shot a caribou over 300 yards...but never shot one under 200 yards, either. I know of many taken within 50 yards, just none of mine...

    The choice is a hard one...the 340 and the 375 are both excellent rounds. The 375 will leave more chops and backstrap; the 340 will touch them a bit farther out...
     
  16. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    :D
     
  17. Clayslayer

    Clayslayer Well-Known Member

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    So the 375 H&H Magnum is similar ballistically to the 30-06? I didn't know that. I know that it's a cannon sutible for shooting down aircraft along with most african game but figured the intended range was, like most big bores, rather short.
     
  18. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    KlayKiller,

    The 375 H&H is the worlds most useful caliber, IMHO. This is hard for me to say, since I love the 30-06 (have a slug of'em). You can hunt anything...anywhere with a 375 H&H. It is almost too small for elephant and M'bogo, and is way too big for dik-dik or steenbok, but will do nicely for all of them and everything in between.

    One thing I like about the 375 is that it doesn't destroy too much meat. On average, you'll get far less blood-shot meat with a 375 than with a 270. :idea:

    The BIG downside of the 375 is it's weight. Rifles made for the 375 are much heavier than they need be. My pre 64 Mdl 70 weighs about 9 pounds. The Sako Safari Grade I just sold was a bit better at around 8+. My Interarms Alaskan wieghs about the same as the Mdl 70. This does not make for a good sheep rifle. :roll: :lol: :!:
     
  19. Clayslayer

    Clayslayer Well-Known Member

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    I'd like to try one one of these days. Just for kicks and giggles. That's about it though.

    To be honese I'm a bit of a recoil puss. I can stand a few brutal (aka Weatherby) thrashings but only a few. I have a Win mod 70 XTR Featherweight in .270 that beats the snot out of me. I love the gun and it shoots great....I just can't sit at a bench and shoot it all day. 20-30 rounds and that's it.
     
  20. Tomo

    Tomo Member

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    Try the old 8mmx68S is the best choice for elk,big game at long range trust me.I've tried everything and this is better than any.I am PH for years and no problem