Decision time - 7mm Rem. mag or 300 WSM

Discussion in 'Rifle Opinions' started by CPUFed, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. CPUFed

    CPUFed Guest

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    I have been shooting 7mm Rem mag for years now. I've never had a problem downing any animal including elk and bear with it. I'm looking at trading my 7mm mag for a 300 WSM. Any opinions? I know the 300 WSM outperforms the 7mm, but what about recoil difference? Both rifles in question are Weatherby Vanguards. Thanks all.
     

  2. mountainview

    mountainview Super Member

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    CPU,

    Why not hold on to the 7 mag AND get the new WSM?If nothing else, you can never have too many rifles :) .

    Sounds like the 7 mag is a shooter and works well for ya' and would be a good backup in case it was needed. Most of the regrets I have had have not been in getting a new or different rig, it is skewed towards the ones I got rid of that were good shooter. One other thing to keep in mind is ammo costs if you are shooting factory, if the budget gets tight from time to time, the 300 WSM will likely burn a hole even faster than the 7 mag though handloading can take out a lot of the sting.

    Safe shooting.
     
  3. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    The 7mm mag is a great caliber but only shoots up to 175 gr I think and 300wsm shoots up to 220gr,but as the article stated you will feel the difference.Both are good rounds so if you HAVE to make a choice go enny menny minney mo.............Drop-Shot
     
  4. 8pointduck

    8pointduck Super Member

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    This would be a hard one for me. Both calibers have there strong points, but I would have to go with the 300 because of bullet versatility.
     
  5. bbanbury

    bbanbury Super Member

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    I agree with mountainview - if you can hang onto the 7 mm, you probably should. It's a good round and does a good job on the game you mentioned.

    I don't have any experience with the 300 WSM but it seems like a good round too. However, I don't think there is enough distinction between it and the 7 mm. How about a step up to the 325 WSM (if you're interested in getting a WSM...).

    325 Info
    http://www.winchesterguns.com/prodinfo/ ... .asp?id=76
     
  6. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    I agree with 8point,the 30 cal has alot of offerings and would be hard to beat.What I have seen,the 325wsm is getting more attention than I first thought,I may have to reread the article on the 325wsm.Drop-Shot
     
  7. javven

    javven Guest

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    I doubt the animals downrange will know the difference between one and the other. Nor do I think 30WSM is going to make your job of getting at those animals any easier.
     
  8. I just bought me a Wincester model 70 super shadow in 300 WSM I got to shoot it last week. The recoil was not bad as I thought it was going to be almost felt like a 30-06. I use to have a ruger model 77 in 7 mm rem mag my Winchester felt much better then the ruger did in recoil. Winchester put a good recoil pad on its rifle I got good groups out a a 100 yards the range here only go a 100 I was useing 150 gr bullet. I did find it hard to find a variaty of bullets around here since the WSM is only a couple of years old and most people like to shot there old reliable guns. I found prices for shells to run from 20.00 to 30.00 dollars a box for me that means i will start reloading my own shells now. good luck on what ever gun you choose :D
     
  9. 8pointduck

    8pointduck Super Member

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    Handloading will always be a plus . If you don't , you should.I rarely ever shoot factory loads anymore. It is different when you shoot something you made yourself than just picking up a box of bullets from wally world.Don't let anyone tell you that factory loads are just as good as handloads.
     
  10. I use to hand load years ago but I moved so much being in the mil but now that I am retiered i will set up again for reloading
     
  11. craigc

    craigc Guest

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    how do u hand load? is it hard to do? what materials do you need? how much do you save?
     
  12. Big Yac

    Big Yac Guest

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    some calibers you can save a good bit, and some dont really save too much over factory ammo. I think mostly handloading is good for improved accuracy and performance...and its nice to take an animal or shoot a really small group with something that you put together. I'm actually about to start reloading rifle / handgun ammo. Me, I'm going with an RCBS Rock Chucker. One of the most important things in reloading is a good scale. So to answer your question about what do you need to get started, you need a press, the correct dies, a scale, various reloading manuals, case trimmer, some sort of way to prime the brass, and probably even a tumbler. I"m sure theres more but thats all I can think of right now.
     
  13. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    creigc if I can do it anybody can do it.Get a good manual first and read it.You will quickly understand over loading and under loading.Don't let that scare you but make you cautious.Besides being easy it's fun.It makes getting ready for a hunt all the more exciting.If you are too cautious then find a buddy and watch him,but read that manual first.Hornady makes a 2 volume set and super instructions.There are also books for beginner handloading,loading for accuracy and fun.I started with hand squeezing tools for reloading.hard on the hands but it worked,that was in the late 60's and since then I bought a rockchuker press from RCBS and I have kept notes since 72.You can taylor a load for any caliber with your favorite bullet.It's fun.Drop-Shot
     
  14. 8pointduck

    8pointduck Super Member

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    For a rifle shooter it is the way to go. You can make some premium loads that will surely outperform factory.
     
  15. berettashotgun

    berettashotgun Guest

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    I generally grab a Ruger #1 in .270 to go deer hunting with here in OK, which one I grab is a toss-up. One is an old red pad model, the other is 20 years newer. They both work identically- just like the 7mag and 300wsm do.I reload a ton and although I haven't reloaded any wsm cartridges- I have reloaded and do own several rifles chambered in A.I. calibers-22-250, 243, and 280. That stated, I think the sharp shoulder angle on the wsm brass would be a pain. I used a 300win for years on my deer hunting, mostly to impress the others around me :wink: but got smart and less insecure and started using the 270.Dang the 270 is an excellent deer caliber! I currently own 7 rifles chambered in 7mag , 3 in 7mm STW, and 1 in 7RUM, and think the least recoil for the punch of all of them is the 7-08. I'm trying to make a point on the responsibility of the shooter to do his part to practice and practice,and make any excuse to buy the new gun in a new caliber- but the 7mag will always work- just like the 30-06( it'll be celebrating it's hunnerth birthday soon). BTW~ you reloader rookies-trust me it won't save you money, but you'll shoot alot more :eek: 7mm STW ammo costs about 55 cents a round with nosler bullets and my brass- $35 per box at the shop.
     
  16. Papadoodles

    Papadoodles Super Member

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    Has anyone else noticed that the starter of this thread, CPUFed, never came back for your responses??
     
  17. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    Reflexbowhunter isn't it strange that some rifles kick much harder than others?One of my friends bought a ruger with the stock that went almost to the end,I forget what it's called and he stopped shooting it cause it kicked too much,I said Bill you must be getting older,boy was I wrong,that rifle in 308 shook my teeth.The stock is almost straight and my remington 700 bdl has a drop that fits me better and it don't kick bad at all.My experience is that straight stocks look great but transfers the recoil straight back,while the rifles that have a substantial drop disperses the recoil better,thats just my view,thats one of the reasons I like remington rifles,they seem to fit me well and have less recoil.Just my opinion.Drop-Shot
     
  18. Pat T

    Pat T Moderator

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    Hey Dropshot-

    What about the Monte-Carlo types as compared to the straight ones popular now that still have some drop from comb to heel? I tried to like a Browning A-Bolt with a straight stock, but just couldn't make my eye look through the scope properly because of the excess drop. Never fired it, but now I'm wondering what felt recoil would be like.

    Pat
     
  19. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    Good evening Pat,I think the Monte Carlo stocks with drop at comb would be easier on the shoulder.I watched my brother in law shoot a straight stocked winchester replica in 38/55 and he's a big guy and it moved him.I shot a marlin with some drop at the comb and it didn't seem to kick much at all,I just feel like a drop at the comb allows me to see through the scope better,if you have to lift your head you then it don't fit as well.I have 2 Browning BLR's that don't have as much drop as I like and I have to tend to let the butt of the rifle rise a bit in my shoulder,since they are easy on the shoulder it's no problem.Some folks can't shoot a rifle that has the amount of drop that I like,we are all built different and hold a rifle slightly different.I have personaly found that straight stock rifles tend to have more felt recoil.Just my opinion.Drop-Shot