Mauser Rifle

Discussion in 'Rifle Talk' started by ANDREWB0SE, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. ANDREWB0SE

    ANDREWB0SE Guest

    3
    0
    0
    I was in a gun store that had a huge selection of WWII era fire-arms. Some of which were wall-hangers, but it looked like most of them were shootable. The action on the mausers was amazing, and they just felt really good. It was just a bolt, but I couldn't believe how smooth a 60 or 70 year old gun could be.

    Besides the obvious moral problems with owning and shooting what was quite probably a Nazi gun, what would be the cons of having an old Mauzer for target practice and maybe some deer? (If it's large enough caliber to be legal)

    Ammunition might be hard to find I guess. Any ideas? It was just such a pretty gun.
     
  2. FL-shooter

    FL-shooter Guest

    17
    0
    0
    Very fun, reliable guns. Ammo is very cheap online. And if you don't want a Nazi gun, get a Turkish
     

  3. wired

    wired Guest

    681
    0
    0
    What obvious moral problems? People drive BMW and Benz, why shouldn't they shoot Mauser? Not only that, if you're a WWII history buff, your relic collection would never be complete without one. To top it all off, if you're a collector, a Mauser should be somewhere in your collection, since it is the basis of damn near every modern bolt action rifle (granted, some more than others). It is an ingenious design, and a vital part of world history. It should be enjoyed as such. Get one, and you'll love every minute of it, even if it is just a wall hanger.
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Thanks guys. I think I might have to buy it this weekend.
     
  5. wudjalike2no

    wudjalike2no Guest

    80
    0
    0
    many of the German mausers have had the marks defaced by the russians. if you were to get a WWII milsurp, id go with the german mauser, except of course "the greatest battle implement of all time." Welcome to the forum and enjoy the mauser
     
  6. goose

    goose Guest

    59
    0
    0
    a word of caution of the old mausers. numerous times my dad has seen bolts interchanged and so forth.

    By all rights they should be interchangeable but this is not always the case on these older riffles.

    keep in mind they did not have the same manufacturing standards we have today. one made in easrtern germany could be totaly different measuremants from one made in sothern or western german (as an example)
    when all the arms were confiscated the generally pulled the bolts and then put them back togather later.

    With this in mind you do not always get the matching bolt for the riffle.

    you will want to check the bolt and make sure the numbers match on the important parts.

    My father has seen more than one blow a breach due to this issue.

    just check it over very thorough or have a gunsmith inspect it before fireing it. provided you have good headspace and not to much slop it should not be a problem.

    they are suppose to inspect them and restamp then at a us armory when they enter the states but they did not always do this.

    just be cautious as you would be with any old riffle.

    as far as shooting them goes they are a blast and they can drop anything up to an elk and possibly even a moose in my opinion.

    as far as rounds for it goes.
    winchester just released the 325 short mag which is a .323 ball (same as an 8mm)
    you can now buy 180 grain barnes and a few others for the 8mm so the reloading options just got a lot better then they have been for years.
     
  7. ANDREWB0SE

    ANDREWB0SE Guest

    3
    0
    0
    Well, now I'm not sure which type of Mauser to get. The choices are a little overwhelming. I've read that a lot of people use and like the Persian ones... I lived in Cairo for 5 years, and I would never ever buy an Egyptian made gun (unless maybe I personally knew the manufacturer and had a tour of his facility). It looks like the Yugos are popular too. I really kind of wanted a German one (they’ve always built great machines), but it’s looking like those might be prohibitively expensive.

    Any input would be greatly appreciated.
     
  8. jkvirginia

    jkvirginia Guest

    38
    0
    0
    The Czech vz24's are fairly common on the market right now and pretty cheap.

    And my experience with czech craftsmanship has been uniformly excellent.
     
  9. goose

    goose Guest

    59
    0
    0
    i would have to agree here on the model

    they sell the Czech models here all day long at a local store who never seams to run out of them.

    they are usually 99.99 plus tax. once a month it seams they run a sale on them for 79.99 and they will sell 50 in a weekend at that point about the middle of the next week they will be restocked and plentiful again.

    of all the ones i have seen they are relatively clean.

    not quite as nice as my dads german 98 but nowhere near as costly either

    spend another 50 to 100 depending where you look and you can pick up a real nice synthetic stock