Military Vs. Hunting Rifles

Discussion in 'Rifle Talk' started by ANDREWB0SE, Feb 14, 2005.

  1. ANDREWB0SE

    ANDREWB0SE Guest

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    Why is it that on many military guns, the stock goes all the way out to almost the end of the barrel (WW I/II vintage anyway), but on hunting rifles, the stock is shorter and the barrel continues for several inches beyond? Is it just so you can use the gun as a club if it's a military rifle?
     
  2. jkvirginia

    jkvirginia Guest

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    In general, military rifles are built with overall robustness and "soldier-proofing" in mind, to the point of disregarding other considerations such as weight and aesthetics.

    A barrel encased in hardwood all the way to the muzzle is much less likely to get banged up or bent if dropped, driven over by a truck, what have you in the field, but it's a heavier beast to shlep around than most hunters are willing to put up with. As to which is more attractive, that's personal taste.

    Also, most military rifles have a hand-guard that goes OVER the barrel as well. A mil-surplus rifle is also designed with sustained fire in mind--you'll be unlikely to fire your hunting gun enough times in succession that burning yourself on the barrel will be a problem, but in combat... stranger things have happened.
     

  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    At my local G.I Joes sporting goods store they recieved a whole case of enfields in 303 british from WW2. The one i've been looking at is $159 excellent condition and there having a sale of 50 bucks off every centerfire rifle. I think I might be purchasing this old timer just for the hell of it. 8)
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    The full-length stocks used on older military rifles serve to protect the shooter's hands from heat during periods of heavy sustained fire.

    It also gives the hands something to hold on to when using an affixed bayonet in close-quarters combat. If you see old training films of our guys ventilating training dummies with bayonets on M-1's or older films of guys doing the same thing with '03 Springfields, you'll see what I mean.

    -JP
     
  5. harold50

    harold50 Guest

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    ZACH

    The old Enfield is a lot of fun to shoot - buttstock is a little short, tho'.

    I once read somewhere, perhaps Colonel Atkins, that of the bolt-action service rifles the Mauser was a "hunting" rifle, the Springfield was a "target" rifle, and the Enfield SMLE 1 MkIII was a "battle" rifle. Having owned all three I can see the point.

    You can't make the Enfield look pretty, and it is maybe not quite as accurate as the other two (that's debateable) but it just "hangs" in the hands and the bolt, which cocks on closing, is Faaaaaast! The safety is directly under the right thumb where it should be.

    The British .303 Enfield is ballistically similar to a .300 Savage. Good cartridge for deer and black bear tho' a little slow to handle with the extra wood.

    There are several choices for fiberglass sporter stocks out there. I may do it. I wish the rifle had a peep sight, though.

    Buy it!

    Best Wishes, Harold
     
  6. RWH24

    RWH24 Guest

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    I reload and shoot my M-98 Mauser 8mm. It is a battle dress bring back bcd4 :wink:
    From my Grandfather

    Pretty good shooter w/iron sights. I JB Bore pasted the barrel 300 cycles and the bore cleaned nicely
     
  7. cobra

    cobra Guest

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    Re: re: Military Vs. Hunting Rifles

    Not a bad choice Zach, we used them for moose hunting in Northern Ontario for years and a lot still do. They still get the job done and make a good truck rifle. BTW, the Canadian military still used them into the late sixties.
     
  8. mak48

    mak48 Guest

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    I'm 99% sure that these mannlicher stocks,which I like, were designed to protect the barrel of the rifle when the soldier dropped it or hit a tree with it. those military rifles were accurate, heavy duty weapons that were designed to take a beating and still function flawlessly. hence all of the origional mauser 98 actions still used today.
     
  9. Clayslayer

    Clayslayer Well-Known Member

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    There are a few factors. The wood protected the barrel and acted as a heat shield. The barrels get HOT, even on a bolt action rifle. A LOT hotter than you'd think!

    Another factor is that somebody somewhere probably thought it was cheaper to put the stock all the way out to the end of the barrel. I can't really back this up but the whole "lowest bidder" thing was as alive and well then as it is now.

    The trend eventually went away (Thank God!) with the M14, BAR, and a few other rifles. If you really liked it and would like to own a modern rifle with a full Manlicher stock I've seen Winchester Mod 70s with them. You may also want to have your head examined.....

    The old rifles were really good, the Enfields, the Springfields, Mausers, etc. There are tons of them around today and most of the time they can be had for a song. They're durable, accurate, and will last forever with proper care.
     
  10. wired

    wired Guest

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    Re: re: Military Vs. Hunting Rifles

    CZ makes rifles will full stocks. I've got the 452FS and I love it. The full-length stock rifles actually have fully-floated barrels, so they're quite accurate. To each his own, but I think the full-length stock is pretty classy.

    Haven't seen the Winchesters with them, but Ruger makes them now as well.

    The difference being, these only have the full stock on the bottom, with the top being open (what they call the Mannlicher stock, due to the Carcano-Mannlicher rifle which popularized it). The military-style full-length stock completely encloses the barrel all the way up to the muzzle (or close to it, anyway). Springfield still makes M1 Garands, which have this.
     
  11. mak48

    mak48 Guest

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    i'm with wired, I like mannlicher style stocks, but I think the ruger's barrel is too short. 18 inches sacrifices a lot of velocity and therefore energy, it seems like it would be a good rifle to carry though.
     
  12. surehuntsalot

    surehuntsalot Member

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    I bought an Enfield for 49.00 a couple of years ago
    sportized it with a synthetic stock
    I use it deer hunting a good bit
    it is fun to use an old war horse
    :D