Proper shooting technique

Discussion in 'Rifle Talk' started by RockHillian, Jun 26, 2005.

  1. RockHillian

    RockHillian Guest

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    I am new to shooting period. I shot a borrowed .30 - 06 five times and that was it. But I fell in love with shooting it and hunting whitetail. I just bought a Savage 111F in 7mm Rem Mag and I was wondering if I could get some pointers on technique and maybe some exercises to build my armstrength.
     
  2. Pat T

    Pat T Moderator

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    Welcome to the shooting ranks and ShootingWorld! The most important thing you can do is take an NRA safety course to learn the ins and outs of handling firearms and not being a hazard to yourself or anyone else. I'm not saying this as an insult to you, but I know none of us (especially me) was born knowing how to properly handle a firearm. Probably the best thing you could do as far as practice on your own would be to do some dry firing of your rifle. This will get you used to the trigger pull and not induce a flinch from shooting the 7mm Mag a lot. It can be easy to get a flinch if you're starting out and maybe don't have a good hold of the rifle. You get popped a couple of times and then you're blinking and pushing the rifle when you know it's about to go off. Next thing to get (and this is a fun one) would be a .22 bolt action rifle about the same size as the Savage, and practice like crazy with that. Way cheaper to shoot, no recoil. Thirdly, join a local gun club and ask some of the more experienced folks there about shooting form. Most fellows are good natured and willing to help a new guy out. I hope some of this has been helpul to you, and I truly hope you enjoy your 7mm and the gun hobby. Keep asking away here, too. Lots of great guys on this board that forgot more than I'll ever know about hunting and firearms.
     

  3. Irish Setter

    Irish Setter Guest

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    No better way that I know of to build up your arm (and body) strength and learn how to shoot a variety of weapons is the U.S. military. If you are over the hill (as I am now) please disregard this suggestion.
     
  4. wired

    wired Guest

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    I'll second the recommendation of the .22 rifle. Get one as similar to your hunting rifle as you can get, and practice like hell. The best way to learn to shoot (after you get a little instruction, preferably) is to shoot, shoot, shoot. With a .22LR rifle, you can shoot all day long for dirt cheap. How much do you pay for 20 rounds of your new rifle ammo? 550 rounds of .22 can be found for less than $8, if you find the right place. That's a lot of shooting, and your shoulder won't know the difference afterwards.

    As much as I do not condone learning how to do stuff from a book, I highly recommend "Art of the Rifle" by Jeff Cooper. I don't agree with everything the man says (everybody likes a different kind of rifle), but there's no doubt he knows his stuff. The most important part of this book, in my opinion, is the part about having the right mindset. I would also recommend some of the manuals available at Fulton Armory (and probably from anywhere that sells books on firearms, too) written by a retired USMC gunnery sergeant named Owens. It's more for service rifle competition, but there's some good material in there. Reading books on shooting is mostly just to give a few different ways of looking at how to shoot a rifle, and you get a lot of theory out of it. Once you start shooting and try different stuff, as well as get some instruction either from a professional trainer or a seasoned shooter, you'll determine what works best for you.

    For arm strength, you should be thinking more of arm stamina. You need to be able to hold/carry it for long periods of time, and rifles aren't terribly heavy (until you've carried it for several miles). Many repetitions with lighter weights are best. Also, get your cardiovascular system up to speed. If you hunt, and you walk a long ways carrying all your gear, and get a good shot at something, you don't want to be half dead and gasping for breath. Plus, you'll be carrying more on the way back then you were when you went out.

    The combination of some theory and a lot of practice will help you mature as a shooter and make you a better shot. After all, we're all still learning as well. Good to have you aboard.
     
  5. Reid

    Reid Guest

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    Get a copy of Jeff Coopers "Art of the Rifle" and study it.
     
  6. mountainview

    mountainview Super Member

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    Rock,

    Why do you need to build arm strength for shooting? Some of the best shooters I've known are not exactly Herculean in build. As a new shooter, I'd start off at the bench and get my breathing and trigger squeeze down before worrying about arm strength. Even when hunting there is little to no need to hold a rifle offhand for protracted periods.
     
  7. Reid

    Reid Guest

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    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise and independence to the mind. Games played with the ball, and others of that nature, are too violent for the body and stamp no character on the mind. Let your gun therefore be your constant companion of your walks."

    Thomas Jefferson
     
  8. wired

    wired Guest

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    Re: re: Proper shooting technique

    Mostly true. Even in the field, we'll TYPICALLY be able to find a rest of some sort to help steady the rifle (there are a few exceptions, emphasis on the word "few"). I would recommend it mostly because you have to CARRY the rifle into and out of the field. Hopefully, you'll be carrying a little something else out as well, but as we all know, that doesn't always happen. It's not so much for just holding it as it is for carrying it. That's why I also recommended cardio exercises so you don't get winded during a long hike/haul.