Remington Semi-Auto rifles?

Discussion in 'Rifle Talk' started by ZachH, Apr 5, 2005.

  1. ZachH

    ZachH Guest

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    Hello fellow riflemen,
    I am interested in learning more about the history of remington's semiauto rifles. My grandfather used to always hunt with a 742 in 30-06 and he was a really big fan of remington 742's and I have kind of caught the same bug lol. In western washington you encounter some relatively close shots and having the possibility to shoot off 5 shots in the time it would take to fire one from a bolt rifle is appealing to me. What are the major differences between the 740, the 742 and the 7400 rifles and were there any other semi auto rifles made by remington before these?, Are the modern day 7400's better than the 740 and 742's of the past?, if so how are they more reliable/accurate/durable or are they all basicly the same design with different names for clever marketing?
    thanks for any info :?:
    zach.
     
  2. wwb

    wwb Super Member

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    Very bad idea; there's a big difference between shooting something and shooting AT something. Your first shot is your best shot, and every shot after that is progressively more of a poke and hope.

    As to your other questions, the 740, 742, and 7400 are all basically the same rifle. There were earlier Remington autoloaders.... look up a Model 8.
     

  3. 1gsplover

    1gsplover Super Member

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    :) Totally agree about that first shot. Spray and pray is fine for soda cans and milk jugs, but not for a living creature. JMHO///olde 8) pharte///
     
  4. huntswithdogs

    huntswithdogs Moderator

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    Zach,

    The Remington semi autos have been around forever,or so it seems. I remember seeing one of the reproduction Sears cataloges from waaaay back! These rifles have to been used all over the place for all kinds of game animals. They can be very finnicky about ammo types and brands. Reloading for them can be a chore in itself. The ones that I've messed with did not like being the least bit dirty and wanted to jam up quickly. Accuracy,on most of them, wasn't what it should be either. The weight factor has always been high with these also. After loading it down with ammo and a scope, as far as I was concerned you oughta have mounted it on wheels.

    Now, about getting off a bunch of shots.....I feel that you need to invest in a single shot rifle. Before you take offense to this let me explain.
    Your first shot should be the best shot that you make!!! If you do your part,this should be enough. I do know that follow up shots are needed at times,but to be telling yourself that " I can get off 5 shots as fast as I can pull the trigger ",then you're telling me that you are not going to worry about accuracy.GSPLOVER said it best "spray and pray is good on cans NOT GAME ANIMALS!
    Please do yourself and us a favor. Buy a good bolt or single shot rifle and scope. Practice as often as possible from different positions and distances. Learn the probable one shot kill areas on the game animals that you'll be hunting and aim for them when hunting. Practice your woodsmanship(still hunting, working the wind, etc.)

    Sorry if I stepped on your toes on this one, but I felt I needed to say all of the above. We, as hunters and shooters, need to forever be mindful of what we do. If we are going to hunt,we owe it to the game,ourselves and those that we will be with to do it as well as possible.

    HWD
     
  5. berettashotgun

    berettashotgun Guest

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    The 7400 is an excellent rifle, mine works great and accuracy with win silvertips (.270- 130gr.) is well within hunting standards <1.5 @100m. Get one in a 243, I think that would fit the bill for anything within 100 yards & the .243 is an inherently accurate cartridge that shouldn't have any possible chance of developing feeding problems.Besides~ I always have wanted a nice 7400 in 243.
     
  6. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    I have a 742 an older remington.It liked 165 gr bullets loaded just under max and shoots without jamming everytime I pull the trigger.Since the bolt rotates into several lugs it can be accurate,but a dirty gun will give problems.I haven't looked at the 7400 to see if the bolt rotates into locking lugs but I know a gentileman that uses one every year and gets his elk and deer and antelope and several coyotes with his 7400.When I was young I burned up alot of ammo in a 742 remington BDL custom deluxe,killed alot of deer with it but it can get expensive.Even though I can shoot fast,that don't mean I do.I reload and use IMR 4350 and with those 30/06 cases it can go through a can of powder fast.I've learned what most of the older gents(myself included)have said.Make the first shot count.My uncle taught me to shoot 1 time,even though he had a remington model 8.My first shotgun was a single shot and I learned to shoot once if possible.Since I got older I have never shot the entire clip on a weekend hunt.They don't kick and they are fun to reload for,just make sure you are getting a semi auto for the right reasons.I like the previous post about the 243,great deer round.I sold my last 742 and missed it so much that I bought another,it's gonna be a shooter,with factory loads it shoots 2 inches at 100 yards and with reloads I can cut that down some.Drop-Shot
     
  7. mak48

    mak48 Guest

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    Stay away from the 742, i dont know where you guys live but up here in new england i've seen nothing but poor reliability, rust, bad accuracy, failure to load, and worst of all many wounded deer caused by that rifle. I hear the new 7400 is different but like I said, too many wounded deer. IMO unless the new 7400 is better, do yourselves a favor and hands of the 742. Thats one of the few guns that I see an outrageous amount of problems with.
     
  8. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    Mak48,I own a 742 and used to own one when they were selling like hot cakes,that makes 2,both in 30/06.The only fail to feed was a round I experimented with that was a little too long,not too long in the barrell but the magazine.I lived and hunted in the highest heat Mississippi,Alabama,Georgia,Texas and Louisianna had to offer and I never had a rust problem even in 95% humidity,it even went to my annual Colorado hunt for elk but never had to use.With so many 742's out there and still hunting you are bound to see a few failures.Usually I am the one that gets the 1 out of a thousand bad rifles but on both the 742's I have owned and worked on I had the good ones.Just my opinion and mine could go tomarrow but today it shoots like a bolt gun with almost no kick.Drop-Shot
     
  9. wwb

    wwb Super Member

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    Re: re: Remington Semi-Auto rifles?

    I don't want to seem like a hard-a$$ old geezer, but...... wrong on all counts.

    You must know a bunch of guys who never clean a rifle, and put it away wet in a plastic case. And the wounded deer.... they can't shoot, either. The 7400 is no different than the 740 or 742.... 99% of the parts will interchange, and those that won't are cosmetic parts.

    I have two friends who are now shooting the Remington autoloaders that belonged to their fathers; one a .30-06 and one a .270.... those guns are both 40+ years old, and aside from showing a little normal wear & tear, are in superb condition. They will shoot 2" groups at 100 yards all day long - if the shooter does his part, they are 200 yard rifles.