savage model 99

Discussion in 'Rifle Opinions' started by TXVAshooter, Jan 26, 2005.

  1. TXVAshooter

    TXVAshooter Guest

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    Hey folks,

    I've decided I should get one of these older model savages. Seen a few of them floating around, and they appear to be neat looking guns. I need some background from you masters here.

    Looks like the gun has been made a long time, I suspect there's many a caliber out there. I'd be looking for a woods type gun, open sight, shots to 100 yards. There's some in 30/30, 300 savage, and 250-3000 (what's this one?) Any recomendations on caliber?

    Any year models that were better than others?

    These guns look pretty fun, I'd love to have one in the stable to go with my other savage rifles.

    Thoughts on the gun, stories?

    TxVa
     
  2. huntswithdogs

    huntswithdogs Moderator

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    Tom,

    I saw one at the Salem,Va. gunshow this past weekend. It was a 2 barrel set of take down models in a beautiful lined case. I believe that one of them was a .410 but after seeing the price, I beat a hasty retreat,before checking out the rifle barrel. $2500!!!!! The wood was fantastic and the blueing looked like it was almost new.

    One of my "younguns" has one in 308 that I like alot. It belonged to his grandaddy and had a 2x Weaver on it. He doesn't shoot it much cause "it's just a 308" and not one these new smack ya around magnums. I on the other hand shoot it often and really enjoy it. Sorry its not for sale though.

    I remember seeing some of the folks here talking about them and they should be able to give alot better insight and background than me.

    YA"LL STEP UP TO THE KEYBOARD AND GIVE OLE TOM SOME HELP!!

    HWD
     

  3. wwb

    wwb Super Member

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    The .300 Savage packs just a little less punch than the .308 - I'd say it's the best choice for all-around use.

    The .30-30 is a great cartridge for 100-125 yards maximum on whitetail-sized game. The .250-3000 is a very old cartridge; impressive when it came out, but dated... more of a varmint/antelope round, as it's a little short of the .243 in terms of punch.

    Also, unless it's in remarkably good shape, the take-down guns tend to develop loose-fitting barrel/receiver joints. They aren't dangerous; you just lose a little accuracy.
    Stick with a solid frame if you intend to scope it or shoot over 100 yards.
     
  4. harold50

    harold50 Guest

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    I have one in .308. Inherited it from my father-in-law when he passed. He had three firarms. The Savage 99, a Marlin 20 gauge pump, and a Winchester model 69 peep-sightd .22. Rest his soul but he never cleaned a gun. I came onto the scene soon enough so that all were cleaned up at least once a year after deer season. My wife's family gave the Savage to me after he passed on.

    He shot several deer with it. At first he used 180 grain core-lokts but switched to 150's when he hit 68 years-old. Liked the lesser recoil. Started out witha peep-sight, moved up to a Weaver 4X, and I got it with a 2-7 Redfield Widefield. He'd go to the 100 yard range, lean over the bench, fire three shots one right after the other, check to see that all shots landed in a four to six inch circle centered around bulls-eye, and call it good enough. For him it was.

    He had no interest in hunting anything but deer and rabbits and any woodchuck that got himself somewhere near the garden. He wouldn't go out looking for chucks to shoot at...and it was just as well. Man, is that Savage trigger full of creep.

    Still - when the old man saw a buck within 125 yards he brought it home. Miss him awful during deer season. I lug the Savage some days and remember deer seasons hunting with him. Did I mention, he was my only hunting partner for twenty years?

    Nice deer rifle, you ought to get one, but you couldn't get Dad's for any money.

    Best wishes, Harold
     
  5. grimel

    grimel Guest

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    250-3000 a.k.a. 250 Savage. It's a great small fry/lightweight deer/varmit round. The 3000 was marketing hype (yes, it was around even back then) for the 87gr bullet moving at a blistering 3000fps. IMO, it beats any 6mm on deer for the small fry. It just happens to be nearly a handloaders only proposition - ammo isn't exactly readily available.

    The 99's, well, what is there to be said? It's a lever gun available with modern ballistics (the 300 Sav, 308 Win, and 358 Win being the "best" choices) that is readily scopable. With some trigger work it can be made to meet Cooper's definition of a Scout Rifle rather handily. My major complaints are Savage stopped production, thus good shooter quality rifles now get collectors prices and the metal butt plates are a pain - litterally!

    FYI, I had a chance to buy my choice of 4 from a family friend who was selling out his shooters (kept either a 243 or 250, don't remember). Didn't have the cash and didn't want to sell any of mine. Looking back, I should have bought 2.
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    tvx. my dad is looking to sell a few of his and he might part with his 99 for the right price.

    it is not a typical one either from what we are finding it is an odd duck. Compared to your typical 99

    it is a 303 savage not a 300 (pretty close to a 32 special winchester)

    it is a take down and the forearm has a small thumb slide on it that you push forward to take it off. Most of them just poped off so i do not know if it was an additional feature or not,
    You then open the action and turn the barrel 1/4 turn and it will slide out. At that point you have 2 pieces that are easily transported.

    it also had half of an indian head penny soldered on it for the front sightblade . still has origional sight but the blade was removed and the half of a the penny was silver soldered in place of it. this was all done a long long time ago. he has had it for a long time and is in his 70's now and looking to part with a few. Most of his collection are really old all origional guns this one is to the best of my knowledge one of the only ones that had ever had any modifications done to it out of all the guns he has and the modifications were done back in the day before he even had it.

    it would be in atleast 75 to 80 percent condition i would lean more towards 80 but i am no expert.
    this is what he states it is in and he use to work for a gunsmith so he knows a fair bit about it..

    it has always been stored in a gun safe with silican sand canisters so there was no moisture and it was cleaned immediately after it was shoot at the range or after every day of hunting.

    this was my backup as a teen as i carried a 1909 winchester lever action model 1894 which got heavy at times so this one was a welcome relief somtimes.

    it was just as accurate as the lever action 32. in my opinion it was a little smoother action and much faster snap but anything would be faster compared to that old 32 with the long octagon barrel and 10 round tube.

    personaly i thought the 303 had a little better ballistics and a little longer range but i would have to look at the ballistic data on it to say for sure.

    if you would like some pics of it he has a digital camera that i sold his that would take some crisp shots of it.

    i will say this much. no matter where you find one if you are looking for a good brush gun with a fast snap and descent accuracy for those fast jump shots i would take this up againt my old man with his model 14 pump 35 anyday and that man dosn't miss anything under 75 to 100 yards with that riffle.

    much more than that though and he can't see it hahahahaha

    all joking aside though it is a very fine gun let me know if your interested. I would imagine he would want to get an estimate from a gun smith before he would sell it though as sometime he is a little off but usually pretty darn close.

    the 1909 lever action 32 model 1894 that i use about gave me a heart attack when he said what it was worth. 80 percent estimated at 5500. sure enough the gunsmith at the local shop offered him 5 and he wouldn't part with it as i shot my first deer with it and he knows i love it so it will be handed down.
     
  7. TXVAshooter

    TXVAshooter Guest

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    Goose,

    I'm interested in talking a bit more...get registered and send me a PM and we'll talk more...

    A .303, that'd be an odd ball caliber to have, but a goody.

    TxVa
     
  8. goose

    goose Guest

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    ok. i am official now :lol:

    he is going to take some digital pics of it tonight for me

    every riffle he owns also has all the reloading dies for it

    generally he will also have alteast 3-5 boxes of ammo which some people would not see using as it is also much like the gun (antique) old silver tips and what not
     
  9. goose

    goose Guest

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    The Four Savage Cartridges

    http://www.savage99.com/images/TheBigFour.jpg

    Left to Right: .303 Savage, .300 Savage, .250-3000, .22 High Power

    The .303 was the first to be developed by Savage, being initially manufactured by UMC in 1895. They were stamped "S.R.A. CO." with "303". These early Savage brand cartridges were loaded with a 190 grain softpoint bullet and their own smokeless powders. Their claim was 2000 fps, which, with the heavier bullet, gave it more energy that the 30-30. Apparently later, the 180 grain bullet as well as others became more common. Later stamps on Savage cartridges were "S.A. CO." with "303" and, as shown above, "S.A. CORP." with "303 SAV".

    http://www.savage99.com/images/303.jpg

    The caliber itself is kind of a misnomer. The barrels are standard .30 caliber. The cartridges were loaded with .311 inch bullets rather than the standard .308 inch 30 cali-
    ber bullets. The theory was the tighter fit would increase pressures and therefore velocity. Savage produced a number of different components for loading including the 180 grain nickel plated softpoints shown on the right. Later, this caliber was loaded with .308 inch bullets. Are there any commercial loads anymore?

    http://www.savage99.com/images/bullets.jpg


    Introduced in 1912, the equivalents of the
    22 high power can still be found in the
    5.6 X 52 manufactured by Sellier & Bellot, Norma, and others.

    http://www.savage99.com/images/22hp.jpg

    Designed in 1914, this was the first "factory" round to pass the 3000 fps mark. However, it could not meet this goal with a 100-grain bullet but did so when the weight was reduced to 87 grains.

    http://www.savage99.com/images/250.jpg

    Developed in 1920, it is essentially a shortened .30-06 with a short neck. What can I say? This is still a great deer round for short and medium ranges!

    http://www.savage99.com/images/300.jpg

    Roll your own?

    http://www.savage99.com/images/tool.jpg
     
  10. Logjam

    Logjam Super Member

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    The 303 Savage is like the 30/30 and can be used as such, but the rounds are not interchangeable.

    When the 250/3000 came out it was the cat's meow. It fired a .25 caliber bullet at 3000 fps, which was the buzz word at the time. I think it uses an 87 grain bullet to get that speed, as did the .257 Roberts of old. The round has been obsolete for some time, but it's still a good dear round, and has been used for vermints for years as well.

    The best rifle in the 99 Savage, I think is the 300 Savage take down. While the .358 and .308 are better rounds, the 300 Savage is just fine, and the take downs, if in nice condition are very fine rifles.

    Many older Savages have old world attention to detail and nice finishes. They are very handy rifles. You can use a pointed bullet as well. The rotating magazine with the cartridge counter is neat too. Some newer ones have a removeable box magazine.

    Savage rifles are neat rifles and zillions of heads of game have been taken with them over the years. It's fun to hunt with one of these old war horses, and they shoot just fine.
     
  11. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    You MUST have the headspace checked on any 99 takedown. They tend to get sloppy after a while. I do like them, however, and dated a woman for three years simply because she had a mint 99 takedown in 250/300 and a mint S&W in 44 Russian...

    No, I didn't end up with either...the guns, I mean. :wink:

    I would choose the 99 in 308 first, then 358, 300, 243, 250...

    I only took the 308 first, because it is the most useful all around and not as high priced as the 358. The 300s are all over the place and at good prices. My 99 is a 300 and has killed many deer, an elk, and a moose prior to my owning it. I have taken several deer and a black bear with the 300...did all I asked of it. :D Mine is circa about 1956 and is very nicely machined; still tight and accurate. It has its share of scrapes and scratches, but is a wonderful rifle, still. I mounted a Weaver K3 P&CH on it in a Weaver Pivot mount. It makes a great woods and close quarters rifle! :D
     
  12. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    By the way, Goose has a pretty good grip on Savage 99s and can probably shed more light on the subject than I. You might give him a PM if you have specific questions.

    luv2safari
     
  13. Logjam

    Logjam Super Member

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    Re: re: savage model 99

    I would choose the 99 in 308 first, then 358, 300, 243, 250...

    [/quote]

    I have two Savage rifles. One is a model 99 in 308. As I recall it's a featherweight, but I'm not sure. It came with a neat Burris scope too.

    My other Savage is a Model 1895. It's in 303 Savage, as were all of them. Now that's a neat old gun and man, does it shoot! It prints exactly 1.5 inches high at 100 yards and off of the iron sights it groups almost MOA.
     
  14. bbanbury

    bbanbury Super Member

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    I deer hunt with someone that has one in 308. Considering it's age, it's still in o.k. shape and is a good shooter for a woods deer rifle. Of the 10 years I've hunted with him, it's never failed. All in all I think it's a good rifle - just expensive now.
     
  15. harold50

    harold50 Guest

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    ...and so I'm down at the range this morning with the old .308 and peep sights having a ball shooting rested (not thrown!) clay pidgeons.

    Twenty-something-year-old asks me what kind of "rifle you're shooting?". I let him shoot a few rounds. He asks "Where would you use this - it has no scope?".

    So I set up a target at the 50-yard rail, hand him the rifle, and ask him to take an aimed shot off-hand at the target. Lord, how he aimed , and aimed, and aimed. Finally he shot. He was dissapointed that he was in the white outside of the 100-yard style bullseye. So we talked a little about the size of a whitetail's chest.

    Then I had him take a standing position with the rifle rested in his arm ( we're alone btb) and from behind I place my hat in front of his eyes. I tell him to imagine that it is a rainy , nasty, snowy-sleet day and that his scope lenses would be full of water, and , he's carrying the peep sighted rifle in the brush because he's tired of fighting with the wet scope. I told him to fire all three rounds as soon as he could see the paper target and that any hit on the paper would be vital to a deer. He put all three into the paper and got the point - quick-pointing rifle and clear sights.

    Kid's a former boy scout of mine - what a great morning!...and with Dad's old 99.

    Best wishes, Harold
     
  16. 1gsplover

    1gsplover Super Member

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    :) :) :) Really good story. Always nice to hear something POSITIVE happening at the range, and with a younger chap, to boot. Good on you, mate. :) ///olde ph.///
     
  17. Logjam

    Logjam Super Member

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    A close friend of mine, now demised; bought one of those Model 99's with the .410 barrel. His widow still owns the gun. It is in 22 Savage High Power, which I think all are. It is as mint as a gun can be. My friend bought it from a widow who was selling her husband's gun collection. He paid her $125 for it about 20 years ago.

    He spent a lot of time looking for a forearm for the .410 barrel. He finally wrote to The American Rifleman and discovered that they didn't make forearms for it. You just screwed in the shotgun barrel and shot it by holding the barrel. As I recall the shotgun is single shot.