Seating Bullet into the riflings

Discussion in 'Handloads' started by [Smoke], Oct 5, 2005.

  1. [Smoke]

    [Smoke] Active Member

    34
    0
    0
    I hear alot of talk about doing this and have read manuals suggesting to do this. But I have yet read or figured out a GOOD way of doing this. I've tried using a marker to "color" the bullet and then chamber it into the rifle. The bullet gets to scuffed up to tell.
    So....how would I go about doing this?

    Thanks,
    [Smoke]
     
  2. The_Cook

    The_Cook Guest

    263
    0
    0
    well you aren't actually supposed to have the bullet touch the lands, you want it to be .01 +/-.005 from where the rifling begins. Eh for bolt action guns this process is pretty easy, did it with my 30-06 just took off my action so it was just the barrel and used a candle to blacken up a beyond OAL dummyround that I made. I stuck it in, measured where the rifling stopped marking up the bullet, then adjusted my seating die until the bullet was at the new OAL, reblackened, measured and then adjusted again.

    I imagine with an semiauto it might be harder if you can't get the barrel outta the housing. It might help out the guys if you were to specify what kinda gun you were trying to do it to.
     

  3. [Smoke]

    [Smoke] Active Member

    34
    0
    0
    Sorry bout that...Remington 700 30-06.
     
  4. The_Cook

    The_Cook Guest

    263
    0
    0
    COOL! same gun I have! Remington 700sps

    Yeah easy simple just take stuff off to make it easy to stick the bullet in with out it touching anything on the way in. I just stripped my 700 down to the barrel and kept candle blacking by dummy round and sticking it in until I had no rifling marks on it. Just remember that each bullet will contact the rifling at a different point so you have to make yourself a dummy round for each bullet you load for reference. Don't forget to write down OAL somewhere too, two records are harder to lose than one. From that point you can play around with your OAL until you find something you like.

    What I like to do is play with a powder until I find a good group that can't be made better with further powder load tweeking. Once that's done that's when I start playing around with OAL. some bullets like to be .010 from the lands/rifling, others .005 and so on, so play around with it until you find a group that you can't make better.

    That's when I start weighing things. weigh the bullet, repeat process till satisfied, weigh the case repeat rinse wash you get the idea.

    In my opinion if you geek out on your ammunition more than that you're starting to get into benchloader territory, and as a hunter if I can get my groups to >1" at 100yrds or be able to hit a soda can at 600yrds I'm happy.

    BTW the reason why I like reloading and guns so much is that it's alot cheaper to geek out on a firearm than it is to geek out on a car. Lapping (polishing) a bore is alot cheaper to do than a port polish job on a car.
     
  5. shooter93

    shooter93 Well-Known Member

    101
    0
    0
    For a hunting or general use gun you don't want to seat the bullets into the lands. This is primarily used by bench shooters and occasionally varmit shooters. Keep them atleast .005 off the lands . This would also mean your loads should be reduced 10% to 15% and work back up. When bullets are closer to the lands pressures rise and can rise a lot. The best way and safest to seat bullets into or near the lands is with a Stoney Point gauge. You can get the dimension with a cleaning rod and a bullet but it's not super precise. It can haowever give you a starting point. If a bullet has definite land marks on it you can easily be into the lands then thousandths which would raise pressures significantly.
     
  6. The_Cook

    The_Cook Guest

    263
    0
    0
    HEY GUYS!!! Luv2S, dropshot, pipe in on this cause I'm still pretty new at reloading I'd feel alot better if there are some more posts for this guy.
     
  7. [Smoke]

    [Smoke] Active Member

    34
    0
    0
    http://www.bullberry.com/loadnotes.html

    Special Super Whiz Bang Seating Depth Indicator Tool:
    Using a DREMEL Tool cut of disk, cut the one side of the neck lengthwise, of a sized case to the point just above the shoulder. Insert the bullet to just enter the neck, close the action. The bullet will be pushed in to the case. Measure the overall length and subtract .025. This can be done several times to determine exact length and take an average. The variation was so small using this method as to be insignificant.


    Cook...
    You mentioned weighing cases. What are they suppose to weigh out at? And does it really make much of a difference? As long as all cases are trimmed to desired length and are same brand of case they should all come out to weigh the same.
     
  8. The_Cook

    The_Cook Guest

    263
    0
    0
    If you're trying to hit a 5" target standing at 600yrds and you have a good load you like, weighing the cases will weed out the oddballs in weight. If it's heavier it means it has more material somewhere. Winchester brass is pretty consistent, but you'll find maybe a good 20 that are above or below 4-10 grains different from the averaged norm.
    Remington brass has a couple more which surprised me.
    Kinda funny Remington makes good guns, but ammunition and ammo parts they kinda blow. While winchester guns are okay, but they have good ammunintion and ammo parts. I don't get many opportunities to get out of the city and hunt, but I can put 2-3hrs at the range on sundays and 2hrs on tuesdays to reload so I have the time to geek out as much as I want. =)