See thru mounts????

Discussion in 'Rifle Opinions' started by MeandCoco, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. MeandCoco

    MeandCoco Guest

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    Anybody using them with sucess? I had 'em on my marlin 30-30 and all started out okay but after about 30 shots or so I could hardly hold a steady group even at 50 yds. I've since removed the see thru mounts and replaced them with Weaver Pro View mounts and learned that my 30-30 is alot more accurate than I had originally thought...
     
  2. slugmensch

    slugmensch Guest

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    I used them for years, on one of my .308's - which also had iron sights. IF you use GOOD ones, they can be OK. It is a bit more difficult to get (and maintain) "zero" with them, in my experience, as the relatively large stand-off distance of the scope introduces more built-in error, which must be compensated. Obviously, with the scope mounted so high, there can be mechanical complications, especially if the mounts are not "rock-solid". I think that this is the major problem that most have with them (if they indeed have a problem). The ones I used were chosen very carefully...and never gave me trouble. Some types I have seen, such as the 2 pc. ones, which clamp onto Weaver-type bases, are not reliable (to prevent any movement). I always used 1 pc. units, which attached directly to the receiver and were very wide - they had 2 hold-down screws on each side of the ring top half. These always worked well, for me.
    As it happens, my eyes will not let me use iron sights anymore - so I don't use see-through mounts now.
    Overall, I think that see-throughs should be a last choice. Mounting the scope as low as possible does not introduce as much built-in parallax into the system... and the mounts will be naturally more rigid. I tell people now that, if they wish to be able to use iron sights as a backup, invest in a set of QUALITY "quick-detach" rings, as low as practical. Then, if they should need the iron sights, it is only a simple matter to make the change. With a good, rigid QD set-up, using the back-up irons is usually never necessary, anyway.
     

  3. JDS

    JDS Member

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    The strongest see through mounts I’ve used on a rifle are offered by Millett. The mounts are made from airplane aluminum, which is very strong. They are 2 piece with 4 allen screws to hold the top scope ring down. The have an excellent mount to receiver design feature that put simply works very strongly. And they are made in the USA if that matters. I have used this mount on a couple 30-06 rifles with no problems keeping the scope at zero after several years hunting and shooting. If you go with see through mounts... Make sure you get a better scope with decent eye relief. A lessor scope with high see through mounts will give you trouble shooting consistently. Best of Luck..!
     
  4. MeandCoco

    MeandCoco Guest

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    I thought about trying that but I was at my wits end and took the advice of my local & wise gunsmith and got rid of them. Seems they were in fact the problem. Thanks for the replies guys. I really appreciate your knowledge. I've only recently gotten into shooting rifles and shotguns within the last 3 years. I knew practically nothing 3 years ago and just when I feel like I'm starting to turn the corner, I run into or converse with people with much superior knowledge, such as yourselves. A lot of us newbies appreciate the help. Thank you.
     
  5. luvtohunt.com

    luvtohunt.com Guest

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    I haven't had a use for them and usually I find they cause more trouble than they are worth.
     
  6. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    They move your head up way too high off the stock comb for decent shooting through the scope and will sooner or later get knocked out of whack...just about the time Mr. 170 B&C Points stands out there at 200 yards. :oops:

    Get a good 1.5X5, 2X7, or 3X9 variable scope on good mounts and forget "squint through" mounts...IMHO.
     
  7. bbanbury

    bbanbury Super Member

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    I have a set on my Marlin. ...And soon they'er gonna be off. I've had mothing but problems with them after the 1st year I put them on. My groups run about 5 inches. They're less than 3 inches with the iron sights. I agree with the advice to put on a good quality set of mounts and a low power scope.
     
  8. wwb

    wwb Super Member

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    To each his own.... I've tried the see-through mounts once.... briefly. The mounts and the scope body obscure the normal unobstructed sight picture you'd get with open sights, and they put the scope in a very unnatural position, thereby compromising both sighting systems.

    If you've got young eyes, and you'll be shooting close (100 yards or less) stick with open sights. If you have old eyes or need to reach farther, put on a decent scope and mount it properly.

    A bit of advice from an old-timer - don't put too much scope on the rifle. Many people put telescopic sights on hunting rifles that would really be better suited to punching holes in paper from a bench. A 1.5-4.5X or 2-7X is all you need for shots up to 250 yards, and, turned down to the lowest magnification, they won't handicap you if you're in close cover.
     
  9. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    I too tried them and replaced them with solid mounts,but a few years ago I saw a set up that I thought would be nice.Solid mounts with a williams rear site on top of the ring and on the front mount was a blade,kinda like a short pistol site set up.I used them(they were very expensive)one season and those sites and front blade hung up on every rifle soft case I had and damaged an old favorite.Would catch on clothing or any other gear I carried.The next season I had the old solid leupold mounts back on.Just my experience.Drop-Shot
     
  10. luvtohunt.com

    luvtohunt.com Guest

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    Just as a follow up. I had friend who had an extreme accuracy problem on his 7mm mag. As soon as we pulled the see through mounts off, his accuracy improved dramatically. Drop shot is right, your head and site alignment gets all out of whack.

    Take them off, round file them, and get a good set of solid mounts. There by my humble opinion.


    Kelsey
    http://www.luvtohunt.com
     
  11. [Smoke]

    [Smoke] Active Member

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    I have some on my marlin 45/70. They work pretty good for me. What surprized me the most is, not only did they work well for the open sights, but it raised the scope up perfectly so I don't have to tighten up on the stock so much. I also don't have to worry about getting clocked in the forehead. For me it made shooting with the scope much more comfortable.
     
  12. mak48

    mak48 Guest

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    NO, absolutely do not use them, please. I'd hate to see another fellow shooter make a bad shot on a target or worse, wound an animal because his head was off the stock and floating to see the scope. I have a friend that even grinds down his scope bases to get it as close to the action as possible, he is a wicked (excuse my new england terminology) good shot too. just get a good variable magnification scope and leave it on its lowest setting for "fast target aquisition" and if you see a deer, or whathaveyou, at a distance u should be able to power up the scope and take your shot.