Youth rifle question

Discussion in 'Rifle Opinions' started by sawzall, Nov 21, 2005.

  1. sawzall

    sawzall Guest

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    My son would like to learn to shot a rifle. He is 9 years old and wants to learn how to shot targets. He talks about being on the olympic shooting team all the time.
    I am new to all of this and would like to know how to get him started, what is a good starter rifle, and what equiptment would he need to get started?
    Thanks from a new guy.
     
  2. 8pointduck

    8pointduck Super Member

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    Not sure about target shooting( I'm a hunter), but a .22 bolt action rifle would not be a bad start.You not being a shooter,and for that I'm sorry,should also get involved in the sport.The other thing you might do is find a local gun club and join it. Sounds like alot of money but it will be worth it .A good club will have other shooters that can help you along the way to you and your sons goals.This is an honorable sport. One that take patience and the will to overcome all obstacles. I myself do product testing at the range( my handloads ),but know many target shooters who are great guys..
     

  3. mike .308

    mike .308 Well-Known Member

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    For a 9 year old start him off with a bee bee gun if you hadn't already. Then as becomes more mature and learns more about gun safety you could get him a .22 or .22 mag. Or you can take him one step further and get him a .223. Or another option is a single shot .410. This is a safe gun because he won't have more than one shell in the chamber at a time. These guns would be my first choices for anyone 10 or under.
     
  4. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    These are all good sugestions and I would like to second 8points post that said 22 rifle.Thats what one of the olympic shoots are with,they are super accurate specialty guns but you can start off with a known accurate rifle and see if the intrest continues to grow.Savage,ruger,marlin and a host of other bolt actions would do the trick,Sako makes a bolt action 22 that raises the benchmark for accuracy in 22 cal rifles,if you want a semi-auto there are alot of choices there too.Thompson Center makes an auto-loader thats guarrented to shoot 1/2 inch groups,ruger still makes the 10/22.Good luck.Drop-Shot
     
  5. Maser

    Maser Super Member

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    i say get him one of those break barrel youth pellet guns cuz with one of those all hes gotta have is pellets and dont have to worry bout CO2 tanks or tiring himself out by pumping it a bunch of times
     
  6. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    Good idea Maser,the air rifles of today are super accurate and powerfull,I bought a new russian made air rifle a few years ago at a gun show and I couldn't believe the power and accuracy,the folks said it was equal to RWS,900 fps.I can shoot as long as I want for a couple of bucks and is drilled and tapped for a scope.Drop-Shot
     
  7. luv2safari

    luv2safari Moderator

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    Maser...good choice. They can be exceedingly accurate and are far less lethal than a 22, should the worst happen.

    I remember the days of trying to get 200 pumps into my Benjamin 177 cal pellet gun as a kid, thinking that somehow it would create supersonic velocities. I now have an upper end Gamo for pests around the farm house...very accurate!!
     
  8. huntswithdogs

    huntswithdogs Moderator

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    If you went with an airrifle that used BBs , you can also buy a target/trap. This way you can recycle the ammo.

    HWD
     
  9. wired

    wired Guest

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    I've found a pretty effective way to teach proper gun handling, and with one additional step, I think it might be a good start for him. Here's my way of doing it:

    Step 1:
    Have the interested person memorize the 4 most basic parts of gun safety.
    -Do not let the muzzle point at anything you don't intend to shoot
    -Every gun is loaded. Period.
    -Keep your finger off the trigger until you fully intend to pull it
    -Know your target and what is behind it

    Once they can recite these 4 rules from memory and explain each one, you may continue to step 2

    Step 2:
    Typically, this is with a single shot or bolt action .22. In your case, I think step 2 should be the air rifle idea. With older kids or adults, the .22 is a good first step. At 9, start with a BB gun. This way, if he does make a mistake and it goes off unintentionally, it will be less likely to create a tragedy. From what I've seen, people make the mistake ONCE. It's scary as hell, and they never make the same mistake twice. Let him learn that one with a BB gun.

    Put the target close enough so he can hit it the first time and see the hole. This is more a confidence builder than anything else. Once he's comfortable, move the target back.

    Step 3:
    In your case, this is the time to move to a .22.

    With older shooters, this is the time to put something stout in their hands. Put something that makes a lot of noise and generates plenty of recoil to wake them up. This is the respect phase of the training. Shooting BB guns and .22s all the time can lead to complacency and it's easy to forget what you're holding. After I've put my .357mag revolver or my .308 in the hands of people I've been teaching, and they pull the trigger, they look at the .22s from a whole new perspective. With younger shooters, a .223 or .243 may be a little bit better way to do this one :wink: .

    Step 4:
    After having them shoot a little bit, then it's time to educate them a little on different firearms and cartridges. Start slowly when they're young. Knowing how a rifle operates and how the cartridge works will make a lot of difference. This is the education phase.


    As for the proper hardware, after he's had some time with a BB gun and can display proper handling and suitable marksmanship, it's time to buy a QUALITY .22. I'd recommend a single shot or bolt action. With a semi, it is a little too tempting to neglect proper marksmanship and start spraying (everybody does it from time to time). Get a decent one like a CZ 452 or similar. A good quality one will be accurate and last him the rest of his life, relatively trouble-free, plus he'll be able to do some minor competition with it. If he changes his mind when he gets older and doesn't want to compete, he'll have a damn nice squirrel rifle. Hunting is awesome father-son bonding time.
     
  10. Maser

    Maser Super Member

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    nah just stick with pellets cuz for some reason i have bad luck with BBs and always get hit by them little bastards from riccochet but maybe thats just my experiences but trust me its no fun to have a kid all psyched up about shooting and having fun with his new BB gun and then he gets hit by a riccochet and then he dont wanna shoot no more and dont trust those pellet traps cuz those are not made for BBs and will riccochet but if u feel the need to shoot BBs then use the good old box of newspapers stacked up with shredded newspaper in front

    also too i see an RWS mentioned above which in my oppinion is the best air gun company there is and i got a pistol that is super accurate and its so accurate that i actualy killed a hummingbird with it while it was hovering and if u all dont believe me il post a pic of it as soon as i scan it

    lol hey luv2safari i do that all the time with my crossman pistol thats suppose to only take 10 pumps to shoot 600 fps but i always do like 30 and when it fires it actualy gives a little kick
     
  11. wired

    wired Guest

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    Are hummingbirds a game species in CA, and do you have the proper permits? Are they considered a pest like crows or prairie dogs? Are there any laws concerning discharge of a firearm where you performed this act? What was behind the hummingbird when you shot it?



    Sawzall, we highly praise and encourage your coming here to learn from experienced hunters and shooters. I hope having this kind of thing on this forum does not promote the wrong image of us. With VERY few exceptions, none of us would ever consider shooting an animal simply for the fun of it. We take our shooting VERY seriously, and we are very quick to police our own when it comes to matters of safety and ethics.
     
  12. Vagabond

    Vagabond Guest

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    Wired's method of instruction is pretty sound (I'm proof of it). It will be something that you and your son can share that will provide alot of good memories as he gets older.

    Pellet to .22 is definitely going to be your best bet. Just MAKE SURE before he even gets a good look at any sort of firearm that he knows his safety rules. This is also a good reason to start with the pellet gun first. Accidents with firearms usually only happen once, if anything happens with the pellet gun with any luck it won't be as devestating as with a .22, but will certainly get the point across.

    When it finally comes time to outfit your son with a .22 make sure and get him something that will be worthy to shoot. (CZ has an excellent youth model of their 452 that I would recommend to anyone) If all else fails and he winds up losing interest in competition shooting then at least he'll have a decent tree rat rifle like wired said. Give a man a .22 and he'll never go hungry.

    Now...my advice out of the way, I have to put my two cents in on the hummingbird incident. It's become pretty obvious to me over the last couple of days of me lurking and reading around here that you, dear Maser, should not even be allowed near any sort of firearm what so ever. Your lack of respect for safety and for wildlife is just disgusting. How dare you impose your will on an animal that is 1) Not a pest or threat to you in any way 2) Is not a food source. Killing simply because you can is not something to be admired, it rather shows a lack of intelligence. Being able to take out a quarter sized target at 25 yards is an admirable skill. Killing a hummingbird midflight simply because you have the power proves nothing to anyone except for the fact that you are swinish dolt. In my eyes your propensity for self-glorification shows a great deal of personal insecurity.

    I certainly hope that your dispostion improves with age, especially for the sake of your child that is on the way.
     
  13. TXVAshooter

    TXVAshooter Guest

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    Re: re: Youth rifle question

    Maser, watch the language, please sir. I'd tell you which sentence, but it's all a run on... :shock: Keep it clean.
     
  14. Drop-Shot

    Drop-Shot Super Member

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    Good basics wired,instead of trying to remember the 10 rules(I can't even remember them all of the time)stick with the basics and a kid should be able to learn just fine.We support a sport that can accidentialy take a unintended life if we fail in the basics,above anything else,saftey first.Drop-Shot